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Wednesday, October 18

  1. 4:40 pm

Tuesday, August 15

  1. page Hedgehog edited ... {hedgwehoffsgf_-_Copy.jpg} {eg10.130.871-884.jpg} Hedgehog amulets ... out of borrows b…
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    {hedgwehoffsgf_-_Copy.jpg}
    {eg10.130.871-884.jpg} Hedgehog amulets
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    out of borrowsburrows as they
    {DT6212.jpg}
    The hedgehog was reputed to have the ability to resist all sorts of poisons, and amulets of hedgehogs, made from faience, bronze, or hardstone, were believed to protect from attack by scorpions and cobras. The hedgehog was also a symbol for rebirth after death because of its hibernation. The nocturnal habit of the hedgehog appears to have been related to the nocturnal voyage of the sun, so amulets of hedgehogs were buried with the dead to help with their solar rebirth.
    (view changes)
    10:32 pm

Monday, August 14

  1. page home edited Welcome to Cow of Gold, an encyclopedia of Egyptian mythology! Because these These pages are …
    Welcome to Cow of Gold, an encyclopedia of Egyptian mythology!
    Because theseThese pages arewere put together
    ...
    my own amusement, this Wiki will never be open to the publicamusement. Now, after twelve years of research, I have opened them for browsing! Join me in any form. Feelmarveling at the rich mythology and culture of ancient Egypt!
    Feel
    free to join, however,contact me if you
    ...
    for you. Please
    If you wish to join this wiki, please
    drop me a note before trying to join;- I do
    Finished:
    Egyptian Glossary
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    8:31 pm
  2. 8:16 pm

Thursday, August 10

  1. page Wadjet edited ... Sometime during the reign of Hatshepsut, a colossal natural pillar of rock that jutted out ver…
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    Sometime during the reign of Hatshepsut, a colossal natural pillar of rock that jutted out vertically in front of the cliff face at Deir el-Bahri was carved or embellished to appear as a gigantic cobra, guarding the temple of Wadjet below. Far to the south in the Sudan at Napata, the flat-topped mountain Gebel Barkal exhibited a similar rocky pinnacle that is also believed to have been decorated to appear as a giant cobra. Here too, at the base of the sacred mountain, was a sanctuary to the goddess Wadjet.
    Wadjet acted as a mythical mother and midwife of the king. It is sometimes thought that in early times Wadjet’s power could be turned against the pharaoh himself, her bite being the death instrument administered by Anubis at the appointed time for the pharaoh’s death. She was associated with the protective Papyrus Scepter amulet. Small statuettes of Wadjet have been found, made of gold, faience, and wood. The mongoose and the shrew were revered as her sacred animals - both were mummified and entombed in statuettes of Wadjet. At Tuna el-Gebel, mummified cobras have been found.
    {xxxxcZzdsncbvnbvn.jpg} Double Wadjets protecting the moon
    Feast and Holy Days:
    December 25th (Going Forth of Wadjet Singing)
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    10:40 pm
  2. page Nun edited ... One of the Ogdoad, an ancient god of creation and the waters of chaos. The name of Nun was wri…
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    One of the Ogdoad, an ancient god of creation and the waters of chaos. The name of Nun was written with the hieroglyphic sign for water, and he was represented by the purifying lakes which belonged to every temple. The deep “well” shafts and steeply descending passageways in some of the New Kingdom royal tombs appear to symbolically descend toward the underlying waters of Nun in order to tie them to the underlying basis of creation, and thus recreation and rebirth. Nun was thought to purify and refresh the deceased on their way through the Duat, offering them "pure water," the most precious of all substances in desert countries.
    {021_(hrsherhr2).jpg}
    ...
    man with a cane meant
    Nun was depicted as a bearded man with green or blue skin, standing waist-high in water, supporting the sacred barque of Ra or the sun disk. In one hand he holds a palm frond, a symbol of long life, and wears another one in his hair. One some occasions he was depicted as a frog, a bull, or as a frog-headed man.
    Quotes from the Book of the Dead and other sources:
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    10:25 pm
  3. page Nephthys edited Nephthys {051gjgfjgf.jpg} Nephthys with green skin, a reference to regeneration Other Names: …
    Nephthys
    {051gjgfjgf.jpg} Nephthys with green skin, a reference to regeneration
    Other Names:
    Nebet-Het
    ...
    Nephthys was thought to protect the god Hapy. In ancient Egypt, women were hired to accompany or greet the coffins of the decreased at funerals (professional mourners). These women tore their hair, beat their breasts, covered themselves in dust, and wailed songs for the dead. They were referred to as the “Kites of Nephthys.”
    Nephthys was frequently represented on coffins and shrines for the dead, usually at the deceased’s feet (Isis was pictured at the head). Nephthys was the one who was thought to comfort the deceased’s living relatives, as well as mourn the dead. Nephthys is not exactly the personification of death, but she is the closest thing to it in ancient Egyptian belief. Amulets of Nephthys, made of gold, faience, silver, or lapis lazuli, were buried with the dead. After the 26th Dynasty, amulets of this goddess are found on almost every mummy.
    {051_-tyety_Copy.jpg} Wooden statue of Nephthys mourning
    Nephthys was pictured as a mourning woman, a cobra, a kite, or as a woman with winged arms outstretched in protection. The particularly shrill, piercing cry of the kite is thought to have been suggestive of the cries of wailing women in mourning. The two chief women mourners at funerals – called the “Great Kite” and the “Little Kite” – represented Isis and Nephthys. She was popular throughout the Greco-Roman Period.
    Feast and Holy Days:
    (view changes)
    10:23 pm
  4. page Nekhbet edited Nekhbet {3193295860_6fd9de8d83.jpg} Grasping the Shen Ring Other Names: Nechbet ... Hierog…
    Nekhbet
    {3193295860_6fd9de8d83.jpg} Grasping the Shen Ring
    Other Names:
    Nechbet
    ...
    Hieroglyphics:
    {nekhbetname.jpg}
    {MET.MM.00826.01-ZLhhfhj.jpg} Wearing the White Crown
    Titles:
    “Mother of Mothers”
    ...
    The sky itself was sometimes thought of as a great vulture. To this vulture-mother the dead king ascends, seeking her breasts to nourish him and take him to new life in the sky. In hymns Nekhbet is described as the mother cow that “suckles the pharaoh and never weans him,” a goddess from whom he is never separated. Birthing rooms were attached to Nekhbet's temples, and fertility figures, given as votive offerings, have been found.
    In the Book of the Dead Nekhbet is called “the Father of Fathers, the Mother of Mothers, who hath existed from the Beginning and is Creatrix of the World.” A passage from the Book of Ani said that the first gate of the Duat was guarded by the Vulture Goddess, whose “tearing beak” could admit the dead to the place whence they rose again. Egypt’s oldest oracle was the shrine of Nekhbet at Nekhen (modern Al-Kab), the original “necropolis” or city of the dead. Exquisite vulture pendants of Nekhbet have been discovered, such as the ones in the tomb of Tutankhamen.
    {2762994345_60051500c3bxbxvb.jpg} Grasping the Shen Ring
    The shrine of Nekhbet was known as Per-wer, or “House of Greatness,” and consisted originally of a light frame construction with an animal skin for a roof. Stylized representations are found as early as 3100 B.C.E. but remain in religious iconography much longer. A copy of it, clad in gold, was placed among the tomb treasures of Tutankhamen. On the roof of Tutankhamen’s Per-wer are engraved images of fourteen flying vultures.
    {nekhebet.jpg}
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    10:21 pm
  5. page Nekhbet edited Nekhbet {3193295860_6fd9de8d83.jpg} Nekhbet holding the Shen ring in her talons Other Names: …
    Nekhbet
    {3193295860_6fd9de8d83.jpg} Nekhbet holding the Shen ring in her talons
    Other Names:
    Nechbet
    ...
    Hieroglyphics:
    {nekhbetname.jpg}
    {MET.MM.00826.01-ZLhhfhj.jpg} Nekhbet wearingWearing the White
    Titles:
    “Mother of Mothers”
    ...
    "Great White Cow of Nekhb"
    Family:
    {3156925.01_00010.jpg} Nekhbet graspingGrasping an Ankh
    A daughter of Ra, Nekhbet’s husband was thought to be Hapi.
    Nekhbet was a very ancient goddess of childbirth, and the patron of Upper Egypt. She was the white vulture (representing purification), always seen on the front of the pharaoh’s crown. The pharaoh was known as Nebty ("Heir to the Two Ladies"), the goddesses of Upper and Lower Egypt, Nekhbet and Wadjet. Nekhbet’s predynastic cult reached far back in time, with her image appearing on the Ames Scepter of the very first Egyptian king, Narmer.
    {3250354430_73e6827f39ncnc.jpg}
    Nekhbet was also associated with royal women; the pharaoh’s wife wore the Vulture Headdress to symbolize her role as the great mother of Egypt. The priestesses of Nekhbet were called muu (mothers), and wore blue kilts, reed crowns, and robes of vulture feathers. They bared their breasts when escorting a dead man to his tomb, as a magical promise of the nursing Nekhbet’s tender care.
    {Egypt.Nekhbet.01.jpg} Nekhbet wearingWearing the Atef
    Nekhbet was usually depicted as a vulture hovering with her wings spread above the royal image, clutching an ankh or the Shen Ring in her talons. Nekhbet was described as “she whose wings are open, whose breasts are pendulous.” She was also pictured as a vulture-headed woman wearing the White Crown, Hemhem Crown, or Atef Crown, or as a white cow. In her most ancient form Nekhbet was a wild sky-goddess, with “streaming hair and swollen breasts.”
    {sunbird_copy.png}
    The sky itself was sometimes thought of as a great vulture. To this vulture-mother the dead king ascends, seeking her breasts to nourish him and take him to new life in the sky. In hymns Nekhbet is described as the mother cow that “suckles the pharaoh and never weans him,” a goddess from whom he is never separated. Birthing rooms were attached to Nekhbet's temples, and fertility figures, given as votive offerings, have been found.
    In the Book of the Dead Nekhbet is called “the Father of Fathers, the Mother of Mothers, who hath existed from the Beginning and is Creatrix of the World.” A passage from the Book of Ani said that the first gate of the Duat was guarded by the Vulture Goddess, whose “tearing beak” could admit the dead to the place whence they rose again. Egypt’s oldest oracle was the shrine of Nekhbet at Nekhen (modern Al-Kab), the original “necropolis” or city of the dead. Exquisite vulture pendants of Nekhbet have been discovered, such as the ones in the tomb of Tutankhamen.
    {2762994345_60051500c3bxbxvb.jpg} Grasping the Shen Ring
    The shrine of Nekhbet was known as Per-wer, or “House of Greatness,” and consisted originally of a light frame construction with an animal skin for a roof. Stylized representations are found as early as 3100 B.C.E. but remain in religious iconography much longer. A copy of it, clad in gold, was placed among the tomb treasures of Tutankhamen. On the roof of Tutankhamen’s Per-wer are engraved images of fourteen flying vultures.
    {nekhebet.jpg}
    (view changes)
    10:19 pm
  6. page Neith edited ... "Seamstress of the Cloth of Life" “Mother of All” {050heheh.jpg} Neith with green…
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    "Seamstress of the Cloth of Life"
    “Mother of All”
    {050heheh.jpg} Neith with green skin, a reference to regenerationFamily:Family:
    Neith was the mother of Ra, Shu, and Sobek, and the creator of Apophis. She was sometimes considered to be the wife of Khnum or Set.
    A very ancient creator goddess, Neith guarded the deceased, and made sacred warriors’ weapons. Neith was originally worshiped as an ancient war goddess, who led the charge in battle. She had a special significance for warrior kings and their wives. Neith was called “the Eldest, the Mother of the Gods, who shone on the first face.” Neith was by far the favorite deity acknowledged in the personal names of the earliest dynasties, for she appears in almost 40 percent of all theophoric names. The pharaoh Nectanebo II claimed Neith as his mother.
    {neith02bxbxb.jpg} Neith wearing the Red Crown
    A text in the Roman Period temple of Esna describes how Neith created the world by speaking seven magical words. Everything Neith conceived with her heart came into being, including thirty gods, and then she went on to create the sun-god Ra, who himself created mankind. During her festival a statue of the goddess Neith was placed in the sunlight, to reunite her with her son. The statue was then sailed down the river on a barque shrine, as the celebrants danced and feasted.
    Neith was thought to be the mother of every pharaoh, and a text dating from the 6th century B.C.E. states that it was she who invented birth. Plutarch says her temple (of which nothing now remains) bore the inscription: “I am all that hath been, and is, and shall be; and my veil no mortal has hitherto raised.” As “The Highest Judge,” Neith was thought to help judge the dead in the Duat. “Judgment has been made in the presence of Neith” was a common refrain from the Coffin Texts.
    (view changes)
    10:17 pm

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